Period Pain is Not Normal: The relationship between hormonal balance and period pain

Period Pain is Not Normal: The relationship between hormonal balance and period pain

I want to talk to you about something that's a part of most of our lives – period pain. We've often been told that it's just a natural part of being a woman, something we should just deal with. But what if I told you that period pain doesn't have to be a part of your life? In fact, it might be a sign that your hormones are out of balance. Let's talk about it.

Understanding Period Pain

You've probably heard it countless times: period pain is a standard part of being a woman. Well, I'm here to challenge that. While some discomfort during your menstrual cycle is usual, extreme pain that disrupts your life shouldn't be considered normal. There are two types of period pain: primary and secondary dysmenorrhea. Primary dysmenorrhea is common, but it's crucial to remember that "common" doesn't mean "normal." Secondary dysmenorrhea, however, is often a sign of a more significant issue.

 

Hormones and Period Pain

Now, let's dive into the hormone game. Our menstrual cycle is a hormonal masterpiece orchestrated by various players, including estrogen and progesterone. When these hormones aren't in harmony, our uterine muscles can contract too strongly, causing pain. Prostaglandins, hormone-like substances, are often the culprits here. They prompt our uterus to contract and can make our periods more painful.

 

Common Causes of Hormonal Imbalance

Hormonal imbalances can throw our menstrual cycle into chaos. Stress, poor dietary choices, and a lack of exercise are common culprits. It's not just lifestyle factors either; certain hormonal birth control methods can also disrupt our body's natural hormone balance. It's a double-edged sword because while these contraceptives can alleviate period pain for some, they can make it worse for others. And taking a contraceptive doesn't fix your imbalance, it just masks your symptoms.

  • Stress (many times we don't even feel that we are stressed)
  • Poor Diet
  • Lack of exercise

 

Recognizing the Signs of Hormonal Imbalance

So, how can you tell if your hormones are out of balance? Irregular menstrual cycles are a red flag. Severe pain that makes you reach for painkillers every month is another. Other signs might include mood swings, fatigue, and digestive issues. Tracking your menstrual cycles and symptoms can help you identify patterns and decide if it's time to seek medical advice.

  • Irregular periods
  • Severe period pain
  • Mood swings
  • Fatigue
  • Severe Headaches


Managing Hormonal Imbalance and Period Pain

The good news is, we're not powerless when it comes to hormonal imbalances and period pain. Lifestyle changes can make a huge difference. Stress reduction techniques like meditation and yoga can help calm our hormone rollercoaster. A diet rich in nutrients and low in inflammatory foods can work wonders. I've explored various techniques and solutions, and I want to share them with you because I believe they can make a difference.

 

  1. Lifestyle Changes: Making simple lifestyle adjustments can have a profound impact. Stress reduction is key. Practicing meditation, yoga, or mindfulness can help calm the storm of hormonal fluctuations. Adequate, quality sleep is equally important. Prioritize a consistent sleep schedule to give your body the rest it needs.
  2. Dietary Choices: What you eat plays a significant role in hormonal balance. Opt for a diet rich in nutrient-dense foods. Load up on leafy greens, lean proteins, and whole grains. These choices help stabilize blood sugar levels, which, in turn, can reduce the severity of period pain.
  3. Reducing Inflammatory Foods: It's essential to steer clear of inflammatory foods like sugary snacks and processed treats. These culprits can exacerbate period pain by promoting inflammation in the body. By limiting your intake of these items, you can help minimize the monthly discomfort.
  4. Alternative Therapies: Exploring alternative therapies can also be a game-changer. Acupuncture, for instance, has been embraced by many for its potential to alleviate period pain. This ancient practice involves the insertion of fine needles into specific points in the body, helping to balance energy and relieve pain. It's a natural and holistic approach worth considering.
  5. Herbal Remedies: The world of herbal remedies is vast and filled with potential solutions. Herbs like chamomile, ginger, and raspberry leaf have been used for centuries to ease menstrual discomfort. You might find comfort in trying herbal teas or supplements to see if they alleviate your symptoms.
  6. Adaptogens: Adaptogens are a class of herbs and roots known for their ability to help the body adapt to stress and maintain balance. Herbs like ashwagandha and rhodiola may be particularly helpful in managing the stress that can exacerbate hormonal imbalances and period pain. They can be consumed in various forms, such as supplements or herbal teas. *make sure to sign up to our waiting list as we're soon launching a cycle syncing supplement with adaptogens.
  7. Consulting a naturopath of holistic doctor. They can help rule out underlying conditions and come up with a treatment plan that suits you. 


To wrap it up, period pain may be common, but it's not normal. Don't let anyone convince you otherwise. If you're experiencing severe pain, it's essential to take action. Your hormones might be sending distress signals, and it's time to listen. 

Managing hormonal imbalance and period pain is about taking a holistic approach to your health. Your choices in lifestyle, diet, and alternative therapies can play a significant role in finding relief. Remember, it's your body, and you have the power to explore and decide what works best for you. By actively managing hormonal imbalances and seeking support when needed, you can reclaim your menstrual well-being and enjoy a more comfortable, pain-free life.

PS: Sign up to the waitlist to know when the cycle syncing blend is launching and get exclusive launch discounts.

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